Order in which to rebuild a 1962 Matchless G12 CSR

These are the front page News Items. Only Club members can add news items to this forum.
Deceased
Posts: 23
Joined: Wed Jan 01, 1992 12:00 am
Location: NORFOLK UK

Order in which to rebuild a 1962 Matchless G12 CSR

Postby PASSAT50 » Thu Sep 02, 2010 7:00 pm

Hi all - wondered if the regular rebuilders amongst you could advise me on the easiest and most logical order in which to assemble the components of a 1962 Matchless G12 CSR. I'm just about to embark on this process and thought it would be sensible to ask the advice of far more experienced restorers than myself within the club. I will be starting with the frame on a workbench which is the easy bit; after that does the engine and gearbox go in first, or is it the forks. Any helpful advice very much appreciated. Cheers - Dave Speck (Norfolk)

User avatar
Posts: 3686
Joined: Mon Jan 01, 2001 12:00 am
Location: BLACKPOOL UK

Order in which to rebuild a 1962 Matchless G12 CSR

Postby Merlin » Thu Sep 02, 2010 7:35 pm

Knowing very little about anything I would have thought a rolling chassis would be first just so you can wheel the thing about.
Chemists do it with test tubes

Posts: 7725
Joined: Tue Nov 22, 2005 6:01 pm
Location: UK

Order in which to rebuild a 1962 Matchless G12 CSR

Postby itma » Thu Sep 02, 2010 9:08 pm

If you have the means or muscle to shift this heavy old lump, I would say sit it on a box workbench at a comfortable height and fit engine and box in first, then hang all the other bits on.

most of all it depends if you are doing it in the kitchen or a decent workshop.

Member
Posts: 2882
Joined: Mon Jan 01, 1990 12:00 am
Location: USA

Order in which to rebuild a 1962 Matchless G12 CSR

Postby Don Madden » Fri Sep 03, 2010 12:00 am

I thought Ken would advise to dump the twin engine first, then fit a single. Cheers, Don.

Member
User avatar
Posts: 4131
Joined: Mon Jan 01, 1996 12:00 am
Location: EAST YORKSHIRE UK

Order in which to rebuild a 1962 Matchless G12 CSR

Postby Janet » Fri Sep 03, 2010 7:27 am

Does it have the separate side rails at the bottom of the frame like on a G80? If so, and the centre stand fits on them likewise, put the centre stand on first. It's a lot easier riving a big side-rail about onto the spring than trying to get the spring located on the rail.

My method was to bolt stand with spring and spacer to one side rail. Then fit other rail to spring, and heeeaaaave the rail onto the free end of the bolt using all the power in my delicate little body. Then you can fit the rails to the frame.
Image

User avatar
Posts: 3686
Joined: Mon Jan 01, 2001 12:00 am
Location: BLACKPOOL UK

Order in which to rebuild a 1962 Matchless G12 CSR

Postby Merlin » Fri Sep 03, 2010 9:46 am

my delicate little body
Chemists do it with test tubes

Member
Posts: 434
Joined: Fri Jan 03, 2003 12:00 am
Location: POWYS UK

Order in which to rebuild a 1962 Matchless G12 CSR

Postby petert120r » Fri Sep 03, 2010 11:14 am

Itma is quite right - at our age working at a comfortable height is essential to minimise the agonies inflicted by knackered joints and general geriatric wear and tear. A hydraulic bike lift is a great bit of kit, expensive I know, but if you intend to do more than one restoration and subsequent maintainance it pays for itself many times over. I couldn't work without mine.

As far as the order of battle is concerned we've all got our own approach. If you haven't done so already get hold of a workshop manual, parts list and the Roy Bacon book.

You state "assemble the components" which suggests the bike is already in bits. If this is the case do a dry build first which will identify any missing components, buggered threads etc. I would then tackle the frame and forks - while you're doing this you can sent the wheels off for rebuilding and chromework for replating. This will take much longer than you think!

Restore all the tinware, replace/rebuild the loom and aim for a rolling chassis. I convert to 12 volt as a matter of course with a modern electronic regulator. Send the mag away to a reputable specialist (I use APL Magnetos) - even if it seems OK. After almost 50 years the insulation is probably breaking down and 140 for a basic rebuild is cheap enough when balanced against future potential grief.

Meanwhile you can strip and examine the mechanicals on the bench and reassemble the gearbox and engine bottom end. They are easy enough for one person to install (assuming the lift of course) and you can complete the engine once it's in the frame.

Finally make full use of the club website forum, Christian's Archives and the expertise of all the members. I've watched many a sucessful rebuild guided by remote contol from the assembled store of knowledge available here.

Just one word of warning - DON'T, under any circumstances, ask what oil to use!!!!

Edited by - petert120r on 03 Sep 2010 11:20:08 AM

Posts: 7725
Joined: Tue Nov 22, 2005 6:01 pm
Location: UK

Order in which to rebuild a 1962 Matchless G12 CSR

Postby itma » Fri Sep 03, 2010 4:28 pm

quote

"I thought Ken would advise to dump the twin engine first, then fit a single. Cheers, Don. "

I have done Don, several times, but no one listens...........

Member
User avatar
Posts: 1331
Joined: Sun Jan 01, 1995 12:00 am
Location: WREXHAM UK

Order in which to rebuild a 1962 Matchless G12 CSR

Postby Malleon » Fri Sep 03, 2010 4:33 pm

David,
Forgive me for this diversion, but did you receive the Britax-type crash bar (badge bar if you prefer!) which I sent to the Jampot, C/O Derek Thom??
He told me he gave it to another Norfolk Section member who knows you and would pass it on .
Please let me know if you received it & oblige.

Member
Posts: 2882
Joined: Mon Jan 01, 1990 12:00 am
Location: USA

Order in which to rebuild a 1962 Matchless G12 CSR

Postby Don Madden » Fri Sep 03, 2010 4:56 pm

But I did listen & followed your advice. The Typhoon I showed had a G12CSR engine in it for decades while I located the correct parts to return it to original configuration. If you want to count the rivits, bring a large notebook as there are a lot of incorrect details by necessity.

The only twin I have now is my Hinkley Bonneville. My older Triumphs used to get lighter with age as they shed parts. This one seems to get heavier every year.

Cheers, Don.

Return to News Items

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest