New purchase

Information relating to the Matchless G3 or AJS Model 16 350cc Heavyweight
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New purchase

Postby spurrea » Wed Oct 04, 2017 11:03 am

Well since May I have been looking for a 1956 16MS (maybe a silly reason but I was born in 1956 and my initials are AJS so I just had to get one!)
I came across a few on ebay but they were not what I was looking for (none starters and poor condition)
I finally found one advertised on carandclassic in very good condition, matching frame and engine numbers, original registration number, V5C, dating certificate.
It easily started and I took her out for a few miles ride. Well chuffed.
Long term owner is giving me lots of tips and, along with this forum, hopefully will help me look after my Ajay.
I can't upload any pics yet because I don't physically have her until next Tuesday.
Hopefully, I will be able to have a few rides before winter sets in.
Advice please
If you don't ride over winter what do you recommend e.g. take battery off, top-up/drain fluids etc - I tried searching on the forum but have not found anything specific)
All advice much appreciated
Thank you
Andy aka AJS

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Re: New purchase

Postby Johnobirches » Wed Oct 04, 2017 12:35 pm

Hi, Congratulations on the new bike. Mine is a 1956 16MS - would have been handy if it was '57 as I was born in '57 but I tell myself we were "made" the same year. Mine has a gel battery but other than keeping the petrol tank full to reduce the possibility of condensation and water build up I wouldn't do anything special re fluids over winter.
Enjoy.
John

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Re: New purchase

Postby spurrea » Wed Oct 04, 2017 1:00 pm

Johnobirches wrote:Hi, Congratulations on the new bike. Mine is a 1956 16MS - would have been handy if it was '57 as I was born in '57 but I tell myself we were "made" the same year. Mine has a gel battery but other than keeping the petrol tank full to reduce the possibility of condensation and water build up I wouldn't do anything special re fluids over winter.
Enjoy.
John

Thanks John, that is good to know

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Re: New purchase

Postby Rob Harknett » Wed Oct 04, 2017 1:29 pm

Disconnecting the battery will help stop oxidisation also keep it charged, never allow it to go flat. Hope you like the old bike. They are like people, you need to get to know them. They are all different.

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Re: New purchase

Postby spurrea » Wed Oct 04, 2017 1:46 pm

Rob Harknett wrote:Disconnecting the battery will help stop oxidisation also keep it charged, never allow it to go flat. Hope you like the old bike. They are like people, you need to get to know them. They are all different.

Thanks Rob, I have added that to my list of Tips and Products
What is your view on the use of petrol additives? e.g. valvemaster

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Re: New purchase

Postby Rob Harknett » Wed Oct 04, 2017 2:02 pm

The topic of fuel additives has been well and truly discussed here, even quite recently. Basically, you will need to do many miles before you find any difference using todays fuels, before you notice anything a miss. When first introduced it was said you will get valve seat problems if you did not fit new valve seats made of a material suitable for the fuel. I have not noticed any different on my bikes. Some say the fuel soon goes stale. Drain and replace after a lay up. I never have and my bikes still start OK, That's after 3/4 years being unused.

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Re: New purchase

Postby spurrea » Wed Oct 04, 2017 2:07 pm

Rob Harknett wrote:The topic of fuel additives has been well and truly discussed here, even quite recently. Basically, you will need to do many miles before you find any difference using todays fuels, before you notice anything a miss. When first introduced it was said you will get valve seat problems if you did not fit new valve seats made of a material suitable for the fuel. I have not noticed any different on my bikes. Some say the fuel soon goes stale. Drain and replace after a lay up. I never have and my bikes still start OK, That's after 3/4 years being unused.

Thanks Rob

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Re: New purchase

Postby uktom77 » Wed Oct 04, 2017 8:10 pm

Keep fluids in - sun shining = ride, raining = dream about riding. That's my winter regime!

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Re: New purchase

Postby Group Leader » Wed Oct 04, 2017 8:59 pm

Congratulations Andy on your new purchase.

I too am a recent convert having returned to motorcycling after a 40+ year gap, I've been riding my 53 16MS for almost exactly 3 months now and offer a couple of tips:

1) If you get mileage restricted insurance, get way more than you think you will need. I thought 1000 miles a year of "Summer weekend pootling about" would be plenty. I've already had to phone the insurance company and get them to increase it ......... so far I've done ~ 1300 miles and most of those have been along nice little back lanes :)

2) If you have still to get a crash helmet you might find open face is easier than a full face. I went for a full face because I think they provide very worthwhile additional protection in the event of an accident but it is very, very difficult to take off after a ride - even now I still can't stop grining :D

3) And, on a more serious note, have your wits about you at all times. The condition of the roads today is generally appalling (at least in my bit of Bedfordshire) and man-hole covers, cracks, pot holes, bumps and other features all capable of spoiling your ride prevail. Get a set of eyes installed in the back of your head - there is a minority of inconsiderate car, van and lorry drivers.

I have generally found that as I plod along at a modest speeds (anywhere between 30 and 45 seems best suited to my AJ) most drivers will see the "old fashioned" number, appreciate the nature of the machine and then drop back a bit and will then over-take when it is safe to do so. Unfortunately the inconsiderate minority don't and proceed to sit 10' or less from the rear light. Quite what they think might happen if the bike should suddenly disappear from under me I have no idea (I suspect that they don't have many ideas at all and a complete lack of common sense to boot to be honest). In my experience so far, and with no scientific basis whatsoever, I have found that such drivers will generally either be driving a Vauxhall (pretty much any) or a VW Golf. Just saying ......

As I already had a GoPro camera I've started to use it as a sort of "dash cam" - it's attached to a 60 year old, carbon based, inertial-mass, stabilsed camera mount system ;-)
The results are pretty good and might provide evidence if it should ever be needed.

Oh yes, be prepared to be overtaken by bikers on modern, high performance machines slowing down for a good look and then giving you the thumbs-up as a seal of approval - it's happened a number of times and is most gratifying!

Anyway, enjoy your new steed.

Alan

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1953 AJS 16MS and a 1/3 scale Sopwith Triplane but that's another story ..... :lol:

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Re: New purchase

Postby spurrea » Thu Oct 05, 2017 8:55 am

uktom77 wrote:Keep fluids in - sun shining = ride, raining = dream about riding. That's my winter regime!

Where is the women music and beer?

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